Til/sesame Gud laddoos

til_laddooTil/sesame Gud laddoos

Hi friends ! WORK harder, EAT better , RUN faster , Feel stronger. Sesame seeds are very beneficial for health, generally they are overlooked, but they include the ability to prevent diabetes, lower blood pressure, among  a wide variety of  other benefits !Sesame seeds / Til combined with Gud / jaggery a natural sweetener and full of nutrients is a delicious winter bonanza.

Makar Sankranti, also known as Sankranti or Makara Sankrant, is one of the highly auspicious days in a Hindu calendar and the day is dedicated to the worship of Lord Surya (Sun God). In 2016, the date of Makar Sankranti is January 15.Wish you all a very happy Sankranti. This festival is Tilgul Til (sesame seeds) and gud(jaggery). Makar Sankranti is the day when the sun enters into the zodiac Capricorn or Makara. It is also known as Uttarayana Punyakalam and heralds the arrival of spring season. Lord Surya is worshipped on the Makar Sankranti day and is a form of Nature Worship. Makar Sankranti is observed throughout India by all communities but with slight variations in the festivities.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup white sesame seeds / til
  • 1 tbsp Clarified butter
  • 1/4 cup roasted ground nuts, halved
  • 1/2 cup jaggery/ Gud, grated
  • 4 Green cardamoms, powdered
  • 1/4 cup water

Method:

Step 1.

In a heavy bottom pan / wok / griddle take the sesame seeds / Til, roast on a medium flame till they start popping and are light brown in colour. Switch off the stove. When roasted sesame seeds/ til cools, quick grind in the grinder will make a coarse powder. Keep aside.

Step 2.

Take the peanuts in a microwave safe bowl and roast for 60 seconds.

Step 3.

Heat grated jaggery / Gud with 1/4 cup water on medium flame, stirring continuously as jaggery/ gud gets burnt very easily.

Step 4.

To check if Jaggery / gud is cooked and ready, drop of hot jaggery/gud drop in a small plate with some water. If the jaggery sets like a drop without getting dissolved the required consistency is right. switch off the stove.

Step 5.
Now add the sesame seeds / til coarse powder, roasted and broken into halves peanuts, and cardamom powder and mix till well blended.

Step 6.

Divide the mixture in 12 equal portions on a non stick tray. Apply some ghee to your palms and make small (table tennis size) balls of the portions on the plate, taking care the mixture is sufficiently cool and handle able . If the mixture cools off fast while making the laddoos, then, heat the mixture a little again till it melts and repeat the procedure.

Health benefits of sesame seeds:

  • Flavorful, crunchy sesame seeds are widely considered healthy foods. 100 g of seeds carry 573 calories. Although, much of its calorie comes from fats, sesame contains several notable health-benefiting nutrients, minerals, antioxidants and vitamins that are essential for wellness.
  • The seeds are especially rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, which comprises up to 50% fatty acids in them. Oleic acid helps lower LDL or “bad cholesterol” and increases HDL or “good cholesterol” in the blood. Research studies suggest that Mediterranean diet which is rich in mono-unsaturated fats help prevent coronary artery disease, and stroke by favoring healthy lipid profile.
  • The seeds are also very valuable sources of dietary protein with fine quality amino acids that are essential for growth, especially in children. Just 100 g of seeds provide about 18 g of protein (32% of daily-recommended values).
  • In addition, sesame seeds contain many health benefiting compounds such as sesamol (3, 4-methylene-dioxyphenol), sesaminol, furyl-methanthiol, guajacol (2-methoxyphenol), phenylethanthiol and furaneol, vinylguacol, and decadienal. Sesamol and sesaminol are phenolic anti-oxidants. Together, these compounds help stave off harmful free radicals from the human body.
  • Sesame is among the seeds rich in quality vitamins, and minerals. They are very good sources of B-complex vitamins such as niacin, folic acid, thiamin (vitamin B1), pyridoxine (vitamin B6), and riboflavin.
  • 100 g of sesame contains 97 µg of folic acid, about 25% of recommended daily intake. Folic acid is essential for DNA synthesis. When given to expectant mothers during their peri-conception period, it may prevent neural tube defects in the newborns.
  • Niacin is another B-complex vitamin found abundantly in sesame. About 4.5 mg or 28% of daily-required levels of niacin is provided by just 100 g of seeds. Niacin helps reduce LDL-cholesterol levels in the blood. In addition, it enhances GABA activity inside the brain, which in turn helps reduce anxiety and neurosis.
  • The seeds are incredibly rich sources of many essential minerals. Calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, magnesium, selenium, and copper are especially concentrated in sesame seeds. Many of these minerals have a vital role in bone mineralization, red blood cell production, enzyme synthesis, hormone production, as well as regulation of cardiac and skeletal muscle activities.

Just a hand full of sesame a day provides enough recommended levels of phenolic anti-oxidants, minerals, vitamins and protein.

 Ref. http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/sesame-seeds.html

Nick’s kitchen medical Disclaimer:

  • Nick’s kitchen is for Vegetarians. It sometimes provides education and support to individuals who want to become vegetarian, or move toward a more vegetarian diet.
  • Nick’s kitchen provides some information on vegetarian and vegan diets to the best of their knowledge and abilities.
  • Nick’s kitchen does not claim to be health care professional, nutritionist, nor does it claims to treat any illness through vegan or vegetarian diet.
  • If you have a medical condition,Nick’s kitchen recommend that you consult your health care professionals before changing your diet.
  • Any changes that you make to your diet, and the results of those changes, are your decision and your responsibility.

 

Sesame Delicacy / Til Laddoos

IMG_3838.jpgSesame Delicacy / Til khoyaLaddoos

 

Sesame seeds add a nutty taste and a delicate, almost invisible, crunch to many Asian dishes. They are also the main ingredients in tahini (sesame seed paste) and the wonderful Middle Eastern sweet call halvah. They are available throughout the year.Sesame seeds may be the oldest condiment known to man. They are highly valued for their oil which is exceptionally resistant to rancidity. “Open sesame”—the famous phrase from the Arabian Nights—reflects the distinguishing feature of the sesame seed pod, which bursts open when it reaches maturity. The scientific name for sesame seeds is Sesamun indicum.

Sesame Delicacy / Til Khoya Ladoo

Hi friends ! Here is another recipe for the winter season. Specialty of this recipe is total success to even a first time cook too ! Winter is the season to have Sesame seeds laddoos or other sweets made of sesame seeds. They are scrumptious and give body warmth during cold season.

Preparation time : 5 minutes

Cooking time : 10 minutes

Level of cooking : Easy

Cuisine : Indian

Category : Indian Desserts

Makes : 15 Laddoos

Ingredients :

  • 1 1/2 cup white Sesame seeds (Til)
  • 2 cup Khoya /Mawa/ grated
  • 1/2 cup Sugar (as per taste 1/4 cup can be increased for sweeter taste)
  • 16-18 Almonds, finely powdered
  • 1 tbsp slivered almonds (for garnishing)
  • 3 Green Cardamoms

Method :

Step 1.

Clean sesame. Heat a heavy bottom pan / kadahi /wok and dry roast sesame till they turn light brown (Sesame are roasted very quickly, takes about five minutes). Cool and grind in a mixer. Keep aside.

Step 2.

Grind sugar finely in the mixer. Remove the skin of the cardamoms and grind the seeds.Keep aside.

Step 3.

Grind the almonds to a fine powder, keep aside.
Step 4.

In a pan , fry khoya for two minutes. Turn off the stove. (You can also use a microwave for the same).

Step 5.

Add ground sesame seeds, almonds to the fried khoya and mix well. To this mixture add ground cardamoms and sugar blend it well.The sesame laddoo mix is ready.

Step 6.

Make small table tennis ball size  laddoos from this mix. Garnish the laddoos with slivered almonds. Fresh delicious laddoos are ready to serve , they can be stored for 1-2 weeks.

Note:

  •  Wait for the Laddoo mixture to cool a bit, before making the laddoos.
  • For best results apply a little clarified butter on your palms before starting to make the laddoos .

How to Select and Store

Sesame seeds are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you can purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the sesame seeds are covered and that the store has a good product turnover to ensure maximal freshness.

Whether purchasing sesame seeds in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure there is no evidence of moisture. Additionally, since they have a high oil content and can become rancid, smell those in bulk bins to ensure that they smell fresh.

Unhulled sesame seeds can be stored in an airtight container in a cool, dry, dark place. Once the seeds are hulled, they are more prone to rancidity, so they should then be stored in the refrigerator or freezer.

Health Benefits of Sesame seeds:

Not only are sesame seeds an excellent source of copper and a very good source of manganese, but they are also a good source of calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc, molybdenum, selenium, and dietary fiber. In addition to these important nutrients, sesame seeds contain two unique substances: sesamin and sesamolin. Both of these substances belong to a group of special beneficial fibers called lignans, and have been shown to have a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans, and to prevent high blood pressure and increase vitamin E supplies in animals. Sesamin has also been found to protect the liver from oxidative damage.

Rich In Beneficial Minerals

Sesame seeds are an excellent source of copper, a very good source of manganese, and a good source of magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, molybdenum, and selenium.

How to Enjoy

A Few Quick Serving Ideas
  • Add sesame seeds into the batter the next time you make homemade bread, muffins or cookies.
  • Use the traditional macrobiotic seasoning, gomasio, to enliven your food. You can either purchase gomasio at a health food store or make your own by using a mortar and pestle. Simply mix together one part dry roasted sea salt with twelve parts dry roasted sesame seeds.
  • Sesame seeds add a great touch to steamed broccoli that has been sprinkled with lemon juice.
  • Spread tahini (sesame paste) on toasted bread and either drizzle with honey for a sweet treat or combine with miso for a savory snack.
  • Combine toasted sesame seeds with rice vinegar, soy sauce and crushed garlic and use as a dressing for salads, vegetables and noodles.
  • Ref.http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=84

Nick’s kitchen medical Disclaimer:

  • Nick’s kitchen is for Vegetarians. It sometimes provides education and support to individuals who want to become vegetarian, or move toward a more vegetarian diet.
  • Nick’s kitchen provides some information on vegetarian and vegan diets to the best of their knowledge and abilities.
  • Nick’s kitchen does not claim to be health care professional, nutritionist, nor does it claims to treat any illness through vegan or vegetarian diet.
  • If you have a medical condition,Nick’s kitchen recommend that you consult your health care professionals before changing your diet.
  • Any changes that you make to your diet, and the results of those changes, are your decision and your responsibility.

 

 

Sesame -Seeds

Sesamum indicum - Köhler–s Medizinal-Pflanzen-129.jpgSesamum indicum 2.jpg

Kingdom: Plantae      (unranked): Angiosperms  (unranked): Eudicots (unranked): Asterids

Order:   Lamiales Family: Pedaliaceae Genus: Sesamum Species: S. indicum

Sesame (/ˈsɛsəm/; Sesamum indicum) is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum. Numerous wild relatives occur in Africa and a smaller number in India. It is widely naturalized in tropical regions around the world and is cultivated for its edible seeds, which grow in pods.

Sesame seed is one of the oldest oilseed crops known, domesticated well over 3000 years ago. Sesame has many species, most being wild and native to sub-Saharan Africa. Sesame Indicum, the cultivated type, originated in India. Sesame is highly tolerant to drought like conditions, and grows where other crops may fail.

Sesame has one of the highest oil contents of any seed. With a rich nutty flavor, it is a common ingredient in cuisines across the world. Like other nuts and foods, it can trigger allergic reactions in some people.

The world harvested about 4.8 million metric tonnes of sesame seeds in 2013.The largest producer of sesame seeds in 2013 was Myanmar.The world’s largest exporter of sesame seeds was India, and Japan the largest importer.

Flower of Sesamum indicum

Sesame in Panchkhal valley, Nepal

Magnified image of white sesame seeds

It is an annual plant growing 50 to 100 cm (1.6 to 3.3 ft) tall, with opposite leaves 4 to 14 cm (1.6 to 5.5 in) long with an entire margin; they are broad lanceolate, to 5 cm (2 in) broad, at the base of the plant, narrowing to just 1 cm (0.4 in) broad on the flowering stem.

The flowers are yellow, tubular, 3 to 5 cm (1.2 to 2.0 in) long, with a four-lobed mouth. The flowers may vary in colour with some being white, blue or purple.

Sesame fruit is a capsule, normally pubescent, rectangular in section and typically grooved with a short triangular beak. The length of the fruit capsule varies from 2 to 8 cm, its width varies between 0.5 to 2 cm, and the number of loculi from 4 to 12. The fruit naturally splits open (dehisces) to release the seeds by splitting along the septa from top to bottom or by means of two apical pores, depending on the varietal cultivar. The degree of dehiscence is of importance in breeding for mechanised harvesting as is the insertion height of the first capsule.

Sesame seeds are small. The size, form and colours vary with the thousands of varieties now known. Typically, the seeds are about 3 to 4 millimeters long by 2 millimeters wide and 1 millimeter thick. The seeds are ovate, slightly flattened and somewhat thinner at the eye of the seed (hilum) than at the opposite end. The weight of the seeds is between 20 and 40 milligrams. The seed coat (testa) may be smooth or ribbed.

Sesame seeds come in many colours depending on the cultivar harvested. The most traded variety of sesame is off-white coloured. Other common colours are buff, tan, gold, brown, reddish, gray and black.

Sesame seed is sometimes sold with its seed coat removed (decorticated). This is the variety often present on top of buns in developed economies.

Sesame seeds nutrition facts

One of the first oil seeds known to humankind, sesame seeds have been widely employed in culinary as well as traditional medicines for their nutritive, preventive, and curative properties. Sesame are an important sources of phyto-nutrients such as omega-6 fatty acids, flavonoid phenolic anti-oxidants, vitamins, and dietary fiber with potential anti-cancer as well as health promoting properties.

Sesame plant is a tall annual herb in the Pedaliaceae family, which grows extensively in Asia, particularly in Burma, China, and India. It is also one of the chief commercial crops in Nigeria, Sudan and Ethiopia. Scientific name: Sesamum indicum.

Sesame requires well-drained sandy soil and tropical environment to flourish. It grows about 5 feet in height and bears plenty of pink-white foxglove type flowers. The pods appear soon, containing white, brown, or black seeds depending upon the cultivar type, arranged in rows inside. Each pod (2-5 cm in length) is a long rectangular box like capsule with deep grooves on its sides. A single pod (1 to 2 inches in length) may contain up to 100 or more seeds.

Sesame seeds are small, almost oblate in shape. Toasted seeds feature pleasant, nutty flavoror.

Health benefits of sesame seeds

  • Flavorful, crunchy sesame seeds are widely considered healthy foods. 100 g of seeds carry 573 calories. Although, much of its calorie comes from fats, sesame contains several notable health-benefiting nutrients, minerals, antioxidants and vitamins that are essential for wellness.
  • The seeds are especially rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, which comprises up to 50% fatty acids in them. Oleic acid helps lower LDL or “bad cholesterol” and increases HDL or “good cholesterol” in the blood. Research studies suggest that Mediterranean diet which is rich in mono-unsaturated fats help prevent coronary artery disease, and stroke by favoring healthy lipid profile.
  • The seeds are also very valuable sources of dietary protein with fine quality amino acids that are essential for growth, especially in children. Just 100 g of seeds provide about 18 g of protein (32% of daily-recommended values).
  • In addition, sesame seeds contain many health benefiting compounds such as sesamol (3, 4-methylene-dioxyphenol), sesaminol, furyl-methanthiol, guajacol (2-methoxyphenol), phenylethanthiol and furaneol, vinylguacol, and decadienal. Sesamol and sesaminol are phenolic anti-oxidants. Together, these compounds help stave off harmful free radicals from the human body.
  • Sesame is among the seeds rich in quality vitamins, and minerals. They are very good sources of B-complex vitamins such as niacin, folic acid, thiamin (vitamin B1), pyridoxine (vitamin B6), and riboflavin.
  • 100 g of sesame contains 97 µg of folic acid, about 25% of recommended daily intake. Folic acid is essential for DNA synthesis. When given to expectant mothers during their peri-conception period, it may prevent neural tube defects in the newborns.
  • Niacin is another B-complex vitamin found abundantly in sesame. About 4.5 mg or 28% of daily-required levels of niacin is provided by just 100 g of seeds. Niacin helps reduce LDL-cholesterol levels in the blood. In addition, it enhances GABA activity inside the brain, which in turn helps reduce anxiety and neurosis.
  • The seeds are incredibly rich sources of many essential minerals. Calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, magnesium, selenium, and copper are especially concentrated in sesame seeds. Many of these minerals have a vital role in bone mineralization, red blood cell production, enzyme synthesis, hormone production, as well as regulation of cardiac and skeletal muscle activities.

Just a hand full of sesame a day provides enough recommended levels of phenolic anti-oxidants, minerals, vitamins and protein.

See the table below for in depth analysis of nutrients:Sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum), whole, dried,
Nutritional value per 100 g.
(Source: USDA National Nutrient data base)

Principle Nutrient Value Percentage of RDA
Energy 573 Kcal 29%
Carbohydrates 23.45 g 18%
Protein 17.73 g 32%
Total Fat 49.67 g 166%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Dietary Fiber 11.8 g 31%
Vitamins
Folates 97 µg 25%
Niacin 4.515 mg 28%
Pantothenic acid 0.050 mg 1%
Pyridoxine 0.790 mg 61%
Riboflavin 0.247 mg 19%
Thiamin 0.791 mg 66%
Vitamin A 9 IU <1%
Vitamin C 0 0%
Vitamin E 0.25 mg 2%
Electrolytes
Sodium 11 mg 1%
Potassium 468 mg 10%
Minerals
Calcium 975 mg 98%
Copper 4.082 mg 453%
Iron 14.55 mg 182%
Magnesium 351 mg 88%
Manganese 2.460 mg 107%
Phosphorus 629 mg 90%
Selenium 34.4 µg 62.5%
Zinc 7.75 mg 70%
Phyto-nutrients
Carotene-ß 5 µg
Crypto-xanthin-ß 0 µg
Lutein-zeaxanthin 0 µg

Selection and storage

Sesames can be readily available in the spice stores all around the year. You may choose from whole, husked or air-dried, toasted seeds in these stores. There may be black, brown, yellow or white color seeds packed in air-seal packs as well as in bulk bins. Husked seeds appear white.

Sesame composes significant proportions of unsaturated fats, and hence, should be stored in airtight containers to avoid them turn rancid. At home, place them in cool dark place. If stored properly, dry seeds generally stay fresh for several months. Store hulled “white” seeds always inside the refrigerator.

Avoid old, offensive smelling (rancid) seeds.

Culinary uses

Sesame seeds have a delicate nutty flavor. Their flavor indeed becomes more pronounced once they are gently roasted under low flame heat for a few minutes.

Sesame seeds are used liberally in cooking. The seeds ground with olive or any other vegetable oils to prepare semi-solid, flavorful paste, which is then added to different cuisine.

  • Dry, roasted sesame seeds and vegetable oil are ground into a thin light brown color paste known as tahini. Tahini is one of the main ingredients in famous middle-eastern dip, hummus.
  • Dry fried seeds sprinkled over toasts, biscuits, breads, cakes, salads, stir fries, etc.
  • The seeds are largely used in the manufacture of margarine in Europe.
  • The seeds are used in many traditional south-Indian sweet delicacies, often mixed with roasted peanuts, almonds, and jaggery.
  • Roasted and crushed seeds often sprinkled over salads, desserts, particularly sundaes and other cream based preparations.
  • Gomashio is a Japan’s specialty, which uses ground sesame seeds.
  • Sesame oil obtained from the seeds is one of the most sought after cooking oil in Malaysia, Indonesia and southern states of rural India.

Safety profile

Sesame seed allergy is a kind of hypersensitivity reaction in some sensitive individuals. Generally, the reactions include hives, dermatitis and itching. Sometimes, the disease manifestation may be severe and may lead to serious physical symptoms like vomiting, stomach pain, swelling of lips and throat leading to breathing difficulty, chest congestion, and death. It is, therefore, sesame products may be avoided as food in these individuals. 

Ref.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sesame

Ref.http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/sesame-seeds.html

Nick’s kitchen medical Disclaimer:

  • Nick’s kitchen is for Vegetarians. It sometimes provides education and support to individuals who want to become vegetarian, or move toward a more vegetarian diet.
  • Nick’s kitchen provides some information on vegetarian and vegan diets to the best of their knowledge and abilities.
  • Nick’s kitchen does not claim to be health care professional, nutritionist, nor does it claims to treat any illness through vegan or vegetarian diet.
  • If you have a medical condition,Nick’s kitchen recommend that you consult your health care professionals before changing your diet.
  • Any changes that you make to your diet, and the results of those changes, are your decision and your responsibility.

 

Butter murukkus

Butter murukkus     Murukku press        Butter murukkus                                                                             Murukku Press

Hi friends! We are a big fans of butter murukkus. The murukkus available in stores are very different from the home made ones. The texture and taste of the murukkus changes with the proportion of ingredients used in making the murukkus. While making this snack, the ratio of rice flour and the other flour will give different look and taste to the snack.

Recipe Cuisine: Indian, South Indian

Recipe Category: Snacks

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 15 minutes

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup Rice flour
  • 2 tbsp Bengal gram flour/ Besan
  • 2 tbsp roasted gram dal flour/ Chutney dal flour
  • 2 tbsp Butter, melted
  • 1/2 tsp Black pepper, freshly ground
  • 1 tsp Cumin seed/ Jeera
  • 1 tbsp sesame seeds / Til
  • 1/2 tsp Asafetida / heeng
  • 1 tsp salt / or as per taste
  • Oil For deep frying

Method:

Step 1.

Powder roasted gram dal flour/ Chutney dal flour in a grinder. Keep aside.

Step 2.

In a mixing bowl take rice flour, roasted gram dal flour/ Chutney dal flour, Bengal gram flour/ Besan, salt, pepper, asafetida , sesame seeds, cumin seed and butter. Rub in the melted butter well with your finger tips.

Step 3.           

Slowly add water to make a smooth soft dough easy enough to press.

Reason is we want the butter murukku in strips, not long, broken strips, bite sized. So if its but dry, it breaks by itself as we squeeze. But its not a must, you can either squeeze little and use ur hands to break or squeeze long strips and break later, or even make murukku shape. 3-rub

Step 4.

Heat oil in a wok / kadahi/ pan on the medium flame. Fill in the prepared soft dough in the murukku press with the three star plate at the base in the press. Squeeze the dough pressing the handle, and give it a little shake for the dough to break and fall into the oil. Fry these two to three inches long murukku pieces in to the hot oil. Cook on medium flame stirring in between and flipping the murukkus until cooked from all sides.

Step 5.

Drain the fried murukkus in a paper kitchen towel lined tray. Cool completely before storing in an airtight container.

Notes:

If you hold the press at an angle while squeezing the dough above the hot oil the murukku pieces break easily into the oil.

You can either press the dough down directly in the hot oil or make random lengths on a tray and gradually fry in batches.

Do not over crowd the wok / kadahi/ pan while frying the murukkus as murukkus absorb more oil.

Nick’s kitchen medical Disclaimer:

  • Nick’s kitchen is for Vegetarians. It sometimes provides education and support to individuals who want to become vegetarian, or move toward a more vegetarian diet.
  • Nick’s kitchen provides some information on vegetarian and vegan diets to the best of their knowledge and abilities.
  • Nick’s kitchen does not claim to be health care professional, nutritionist, nor does it claims to treat any illness through vegan or vegetarian diet.
  • If you have a medical condition,Nick’s kitchen recommend that you consult your health care professionals before changing your diet.
  • Any changes that you make to your diet, and the results of those changes, are your decision and your responsibility.